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Gods own sculptures from Gods own Country
Chinnamasta Idols
There are many stories of Chinnamasta goddess origin and all of these stories emphasize the greatness of Chinnamasta showing mercy and power feeding two of her attendants with her own blood. The story says Goddess Parvathi was bathing in a river and suddenly she was sexually aroused causing her body to turn black and from her body two saktis emerged who became her two attendants known as Daksini and Varini. The female attendants were very hungry and they beg for food from goddess Parvathi and goddess said she will provide food as soon as they reach home. Understanding that her female attendants are hungry and they can’t wait to feed until they reach home, Goddess beheaded herself using her nails and gave her blood to satisfy her attendants hunger. Three jets of blood spurt out of her bleeding neck and was drunk by female attendants and her. This divine goddess was then known as Chinnamasta who is a symbol of self control on sexual desire and is worshipped by many people in India.



Chinnamasta Devi’s posture with spurting blood from her neck with two female attendants is also an iconographic representation of Kundalini energy. The three jets of bloods from goddess neck are considered as surging cosmic energy which rises and wakens one's body. This is also known as kundalini awakening. 

Also known as Goddess of Universal love and symbol of self control, this Goddess is worshipped in India and also by Tibetan Buddhists. Though the bell metal idols of goddess Chinnamasta with her female attendants and copulating couples are rare, we have been building the goddess for some time now. If you would like a Chinnamasta goddess idol built in Panchaloha or silver/gold, please let us know. It will cost about INR 45,000 (USD850$) to build these Idols.

These idols are being worshipped commonly in India and abroad and is believed to give a person mental and spiritual harmony in life. Chinnamasta is recognized by both Hindus and Buddhists. She is closely related to Chinnamunda – the severed-headed form of the Tibetan Buddhist goddess Vajrayogini.




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